Category Archives: Consumer

Bathroom Purchasing Trends, Consumer Insight Report 2018

Trend-Monitor-Bathroom-Purchasing-Trends-2018

Welcome to the 2018 TREND-MONITOR consumer insight report into bathroom purchasing trends.

For this purposes of this research, TREND-MONITOR was pleased to partner with The Bathroom Manufacturers’ Association, an independent forum for bathroom manufacturers trading in the UK.  This partnership gave the association’s 60+ members the opportunity to contribute to the research structure, resulting in a focused piece of industry research that is directly relevant to manufacturers and retailers in this diverse market sector.

Alongside this consumer insight research, a second study called ‘Behind the Bathroom Door’ featured a 7-day bathroom habits and routines diary, which assessed participants’ water usage within privacy of their own bathroom.

The insight gained from these two studies answers important questions in terms of consumer requirements for their bathroom, how bathroom products are being used in the home, attitudes to water efficiency, and how this in turn influences consumer purchase behaviour for new bathroom products.

“This insight into consumer behaviour provides valuable information for our members and the bathroom industry.

Finding ways to save water and energy has never been more important and the results of this survey can influence future product development to help achieve this aim.

The surveys also show that compliance is an issue that needs to be addressed. Consumers are interested in having more information about products and have indicated that knowing a product was energy efficient would positively influence their buying decision. 

This gives us all in the industry an opportunity to respond and promote products that display the Water Label.”

Yvonne Orgill, CEO, Bathroom Manufacturers Association

 

The research was undertaken via an online consumer survey with a nationally representative sample of UK householders who had purchased a complete new bathroom or cloakroom within the past two years.

The survey consisted of 42 multi-choice questions, plus qualifying and status questions and was conducted online during May 2018, targeting a response rate of 500+ respondents.

Trend-Monitor-Bathroom-Purchasing-Trends-Respondents

Key Findings

1. Additional Bathrooms & Cloakrooms

Households adding new additional bathrooms and cloakrooms (as opposed to replacing existing rooms) account for 10% of new bathroom/cloakroom installations. Half of these additional bathrooms/cloakrooms are being fitted for practical reasons such as mobility or disability issues, or to accommodate a large or extended family

2. Research Goes Off-Line

89% of householders undertake some kind of research prior to purchasing their new kitchen, with researching via a ‘bricks and mortar’ retail outlet being the most popular and useful research resource.

3.  Shopping Around

Householders no longer expect to be tied to one retailer for all of their bathroom products, indicated by the 54% of bathroom installations which were purchased from more than one retail outlet

4.  Space Availability

Products that make the best use of the available space are at the top of consumers wish-lists for their new bathroom, and ahead of other key purchase influencers such as quality and price.

5.  More Information Please

Sales of water efficient products are being hampered by lack of customer awareness. Up to 80% of bathroom consumers indicated that water efficiency was a key purchase influencer, however over 40% were not made aware of the amount of water individual products will use.

Contents

FOREWORD
SCOPE & METHODOLOGY
KEY FINDINGS
ABOUT THE SURVEY RESPONDENTS
THE UK BATHROOM MARKET DRIVERS
SECTION 1: MOTIVATING FACTORS
SECTION 2: BATHROOM BUDGET
SECTION 3: BATHROOM CHOICES
SECTION 4: RESEARCH PRIOR TO PURCHASE
SECTION 5: CHOICE OF RETAILER
SECTION 6: THE BATHROOM FITTER
SECTION 7: ADDITIONAL BATHROOM ITEMS
SECTION 8: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR SHOWER CONTROLS
SECTION 9: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR SHOWER TRAYS
SECTION 10: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR SHOWER ENCLOSURES
SECTION 11: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR BATHS
SECTION 12: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR TAPS
SECTION 13: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR TOILETS
SECTION 14: EXTERNAL INFLUENCES

List of Charts

Chart 1: Type of Bathroom Fitted
Chart 2: Reason for Replacing Existing Bathroom/Cloakroom
Chart 3: Location of Additional Bathroom/Cloakroom
Chart 4: Total Bathroom/Cloakroom Budget
Chart 5: Budget by Bathroom Type
Chart 6: Bathroom Style by Budget
Chart 7: Research Breakdown by Type
Chart 8: Most Useful Research Undertaken Prior to Purchase
Chart 9: Choice of Retailer
Chart 10: Influential Factors in Choice of Retailer
Chart 11: Choosing a Bathroom/Cloakroom Fitter
Chart 12: Additional Items Purchased for the Bathroom
Chart 13: Choice of Shower Control
Chart 14: Influential Factors in Choice of Shower Control
Chart 15: Awareness Factors when choosing Shower Control
Chart 16: Choice of Shower Tray
Chart 17: Influential Factors in Choice of Shower Tray
Chart 18: Awareness Factors when Choosing a Shower Tray
Chart 19: Choice of Shower Enclosure
Chart 20: Influential Factors in Choice of Shower Enclosure
Chart 21: Awareness Factors when Choosing a Shower Enclosure
Chart 22: Choice of Bath
Chart 23: Influential Factors in Choice of Bath
Chart 24: Awareness Factors when Choosing a Bath
Chart 25: Influential Factors in Choice of Taps
Chart 27: Awareness Factors when choosing a Toilet
Chart 28: Main Influence on Choice of Products
Chart 30: Awareness of Damage Caused by Abrasive Cleaners
Chart 31: Source of Information Regarding Abrasive Cleaners

Trend-Monitor Bathroom category Insight Partners,
please sign into your account to download this report.


Members of the Bathroom Manufacturers Association,
please see email from the BMA containing details on how to download this report 

Behind the Bathroom Door – A Study of Bathroom Habits and Behaviours, 2018

Trend-Monitor-behind-the-bathroom-door-report-2018

‘Behind the Bathroom Door’ is the result of a 7-day diary study which followed 50 UK householders as they went about their daily bathroom activities, and offers a real understanding into bathroom behaviours and product usage. 

As an industry, how much do we really know about what goes on behind the bathroom door?  

Consumers show a concern for environmental issues and yet we are using more water in our bathrooms than ever before.  Could it be that in the privacy of our own bathroom, we are unaware of the amount of water we really use?  

Our 7-day confidential diary study, which was undertaken in partnership with the Bathroom Manufacturers Association, followed 50 householders as they undertook various bathroom tasks and reported back on a daily basis.  The huge amount of data gathered throughout the study throws a light on our private bathroom routines and behaviours, and highlights the amount of water that could potentially be saved through greater awareness and less wasteful bathroom habits.

The research also gives a true insight into the real needs and requirements for our bathroom spaces, and the strong desire we all have to create a functional, clean, relaxing environment behind the bathroom door.

Alongside this bathroom behavioural study, a second study into Bathroom Purchasing Trends was run online.  This study surveyed 500+ UK householders who had recently purchased a new bathroom to assess consumer purchase behaviour for a complete new bathroom installation.

The insight gained from these two studies answers important questions in terms of consumer requirements for their bathroom, how bathroom products are being used in the home, attitudes to water efficiency, and how this in turn influences consumer purchase behaviour for new bathroom products.

“This insight into consumer behaviour provides valuable information for our members and the bathroom industry.

Finding ways to save water and energy has never been more important and the results of this survey can influence future product development to help achieve this aim.

The surveys also show that compliance is an issue that needs to be addressed. Consumers are interested in having more information about products and have indicated that knowing a product was energy efficient would positively influence their buying decision. 

This gives us all in the industry an opportunity to respond and promote products that display the Water Label.”

Yvonne Orgill, CEO, Bathroom Manufacturers Association

‘Behind the Bathroom Door’ was a behavioural study and followed the format of an online interactive diary with two-way, real-time communication between the researchers and the participants.  This enabled daily tasks to be set, further details requested, images and videos uploaded, different workday and rest day behaviours to be captured, and much more.

Trend-Monitor-Bathroom-Behaviours-Diary-Respondents

Trend-Monitor-Bathroom-Behaviours-Study-Households-infographic

Key Findings

1. Creatures of Habit

Our bathroom behaviours are governed by strong routines and, despite a wide range of different preferences and habits demonstrated throughout the study,  individuals tended to stick to morning and evening routines with only slight differences between working and non-working days. 

2. Small But Perfectly Formed

Bathrooms in the UK may be small but that doesn’t mean they can’t be practical and also beautiful. There is a call for manufacturers to provide high quality bathrooms with solutions for small spaces, and in particular storage solutions.  Also better planning by housebuilders who are not incorporating any kind of bathroom storage solutions into new-builds.

3.  Saving Money Not Water

Concern for mounting household bills rather than the environment is the key driver for reducing the amount of water used.  Cleanliness, comfort and relaxation over-ride the desire to save water as shown by the number of householders who for example take regular deep baths and allow the shower to run for up to 5 mins to heat up.

4. Easy to Clean

Words like ‘cleanliness’, ‘clean’, ‘hygienic’ were repeatedly used throughout the diary study and it is very clear that cleanliness in the bathroom area is of paramount importance to householders.  Products are judged based on how easy they were to clean, rather than design or product quality.

5. Functionality

Toilets that flush properly, powerful showers, clever storage solutions – all things that make life easier – are at the top of the wish-list for the modern bathroom.  Although technology has a similar potential, it is currently viewed with the suspicion that it is gimmicky and will be complicated to use.

Contents

Foreword
Introduction Key Findings 
About the Participants 
Showering 
Taking a Bath 
Using the Toilet 
Washbasin Activities 
Other Bathroom Activities 
Storage 
Functionality 
Cleaning the Bathroom 
Attitudes to Water Saving 
In Conversation with the CEO 
The Ideal Bathroom 

 

Trend-Monitor Bathroom category Insight Partners,
please sign into your account to download this report.


Members of the Bathroom Manufacturers Association,
please see email from the BMA containing details on how to download this report 

Revealing the Results of our Latest Bathroom Consumer Research

Trend-Monitor-Bathroom-manufacturers-association-conference-2018

During this year, Trend-Monitor joined forces with the Bathroom Manufacturers Association to undertake two major pieces of consumer research. 

The first piece of research surveyed over 500 UK householders who had purchased a complete new bathroom within the past two years, to investigate how they approached the purchase decision, the barriers and influences to sales throughout this process, and also their attitudes to water-saving products, water regulations and legal compliance when purchasing bathroom products.

The second piece of research was in the form of a diary study which followed 50 participants for 7 days as they carried out various bathroom tasks in the privacy of their own home.  The results from this study has highlighted consumer habits in terms of water usage in the bathroom and has provided true insights into where product improvements can be made and the opportunities for new product development.

The results of this research will be revealed at the Bathroom Manufacturers Association annual conference on 16 October 2018, where our research director, Jane Blakeborough, will share the stage with Yvonne Orgill, CEO of the BMA, to discuss the research findings and what they mean for the bathroom industry in terms of future product development and UK legislation.  

Members of the BMA, as well as Trend-Monitor Insight Partners, will be able to download the full research findings via a link which will be sent out after the conference.

Online INTERACTIVE versions of the research findings will also be available 

Kitchen Purchasing Trends, Consumer Insight Report 2018

Trend-Monitor-Kitchen-Purchasing-Trends-2018

Welcome to the 2018 TREND-MONITOR consumer insight report into kitchen purchasing trends.

If you are a Kitchen category Insight Partner, this report will automatically be added to your account

Kitchen category Insight Partners only

As the kitchen continues to move from a utilitarian area to the entertainment and leisure hub of the home, the decisions driving a new kitchen installation become more complicated as the kitchen space is forced to accommodate an often diverse range of activities.

Cooking is now a lifestyle statement, fuelled by TV cookery programs, the restaurant trade and overseas travel, creating the need for even more kitchen space, when in fact the kitchens in our new-build homes now are 13% smaller than they were in the 1960’s.

With the explosion of the internet as a research tool and the growth of online influencers, the balance of power has moved from the retail outlets and into the hands of the consumer who, armed with their tablet or smartphone, has access to any number of design ideas, brands, products and retail outlets.

This report unravels how these new savvy consumers negotiate the purchase of a complete new kitchen. Starting by investigating the motivations behind the decision to replace an existing kitchen, moving onto research undertaken prior to purchase and the effectiveness of this research, the planning methods used, plus the anticipated and actual kitchen budget. We look at how the retail outlet is chosen, highlighting the barriers and influences to sales throughout the consumer journey, and finishing by understanding how the whole process could be improved.

The data for this research was collected via an online survey which was live during August 2018.  The survey was completed by a nationally representative sample of 503 UK householders who had installed a complete new kitchen within the past two years.

Key Findings

 1. Aesthetics versus Practicalities
The decision to replace an existing kitchen is driven more by aesthetics than practicalities, with 60% of new kitchen installations being undertaken because the current kitchen is ‘outdated’.

Charts from Trend-Monitor Interactive

2. Seeking Design Inspiration
89% of householders undertake some kind of research prior to purchasing their new kitchen, with ‘design inspiration’ being their primary research intent.

 

Charts from Trend-Monitor Interactive

3. Planning It Themselves
1 in 4 new kitchen installations are planned by the householder  themselves rather than using an external planning service. This includes 5% of new kitchens which keep the same layout as before.

Charts from Trend-Monitor Interactive

4. Over Budget
One third of householders go over the budget they originally set for themselves, with over a quarter of householders finding ‘keeping within a budget’ the most difficult aspect of installing a new kitchen.

 

Charts from Trend-Monitor Interactive

5. Shopping Around
Householders are shopping around when buying their kitchens, with less than half of householders buying everything from the same retail outlet

Charts from Trend-Monitor Interactive

Contents

Methodology
Key Findings
Survey Respondents
UK Kitchen Market
Section One – Motivating Factors
Section Two – Research Prior to Purchase
Section Three – Planning and Design
Section Four – Kitchen Budget
Section Five – Kitchen  Units
Section Six – Choice of Retail Outlet – Units
Section Seven – Kitchen Worktop
Section Eight – Kitchen Appliances
Section Nine – Kitchen Lighting
Section Ten – Kitchen Installation

List of Charts

Chart 1 – Purchase Triggers
Chart 2 – Previous Kitchen Dislikes
Chart 3 – Kitchen Replacement Cycle
Chart 4 – Undertaking Research
Chart 5 – Initial Intent when Researching
Chart 6 – All Research Resources Used
Chart 7 – Most Useful Research
Chart 8 – Using a Planning Service
Chart 9 – Kitchen Budget
Chart 10 – Anticipated Budget
Chart 11 – Choice of Retail Outlet – Units
Chart 12 – Reason for Choice of Units Retailer
Chart 13 – Choice of Retail Outlet – Worktops
Chart 14 – Kitchen Appliances Included
Chart 15 – Choice of Retail Outlet – Appliances
Chart 16 – Reasons for Choice of Appliance Retailer
Chart 17 – Choosing a Kitchen Fitter
Chart 18 – Difficult Aspects of Kitchen Installation

If you are a Kitchen category Insight Partner, this report will automatically be added to your account

Kitchen Worktop Performance Report, Consumer Insight 2018

Trend-monitor-kitchen-worktop-performance-consumer-insight-report

This report investigates consumer expectations for kitchen worktops in terms of performance levels and the attributes influencing the purchase of their next kitchen worktop.

Kitchen category Insight Partners only

The growing importance of worktops in kitchen design has resulted in new materials, colours and textures coming into the market and consumers are now faced with an increasing array of worktop products to choose from.

Consumer expectations in terms of how a kitchen worktop should perform in today’s multi-functional kitchen are complex and often tied into daily habits and household circumstances rather than product knowledge or the price tag.

For this purposes of this research, TREND-MONITOR was pleased to partner with WILSONART a leading manufacturer of laminate, quartz and solid surface worktops.

This partnership has resulted in a focused piece of industry research that is directly relevant to manufacturers and retailers in this fast growing market sector and answers some important questions in terms of consumer purchase decisions, product usage and the performance versus price ratio.

This report identifies consumer needs and expectations with regards to the performance levels of worktop, assesses worktop usage within the kitchen, and evaluates the price versus performance ratio for worktops

The research collected and analysed data in order to understand four key aspects of kitchen worktops:-

• The type of worktops currently in kitchens and utility rooms
• Worktop purchase influences
• Worktop performance levels in-situ
• Attributes which influence future worktop purchases

Key Findings

  1. The popularity of laminate worktops is highlighted in this research with half of the householders surveyed having a laminate worktop in their kitchen.
  2. Over half of homeowners surveyed hadn’t  changed their worktop since moving into their current home. Laminate worktops are kept for the longest, a third are over 10 years old.
  3. 40% of homes have a separate utility room, although 14% of these utility rooms don’t accommodate a worktop.
  4. Aesthetics (colour and finish) and heat  resistance are the key purchase influences for kitchen worktops.
  5. Worktop practicality is more important than price when choosing a new worktop, with 3/4 of householders prepared to pay more for greater worktop practicality.

Methodolody

The research was undertaken via an online consumer survey with a representative sample of UK householders.

The survey was conducted online during April 2018 and targeted a response rate of 1000+ respondents.

The survey consisted of 34 multi-choice questions, plus qualifying and status questions

For the purposes of the research, the different worktop types are categorised as follows:-
– Laminate
– Compact Laminate e.g. Zenith
– Solid Wood
– Solid Surface e.g. Corian
– Quartz e.g. Silestone
– Granite
– Porcelain e.g. Neolith*

If you are a Kitchen category Insight Partner, this report will automatically be added to your account

Love food hate waste

trend-monitor-love-food-hate-waste

Approximately 7.3 million tons of food was wasted in the UK in 2015, which equates to £13 billion in monetary terms.

This isn’t new, we’ve been throwing away food for years, but most consumers have been unaware of the amount of food that they have wasted.

Until now ….. in July 2016 an official House of Commons food waste enquiry was launched and this has estimated that the average UK household lost £470 a year because of avoidable food waste.

The household is where the highest percentage of food waste takes place. Households in economically developed countries are responsible for about 38% to 47% of their country’s food waste. According to research from WRAP, a UK-based Waste & Resources Action Program there are 10 main reasons for food waste at home.

Trend-monitor-reasons-for-food-waste

 

As a result, the big food producers like Heinz and Bird’s Eye have reacted by developing packaging that allows food to be kept fresh for longer.

And the major supermarket retailers are all updating their shelf-life guidelines and storage information, as well as relaxing their quality standards so that ‘wonky vegetables’ are allowed in their stores,

The message out there is not only is this food waste causing huge environment problems with the account of landfill its using, it’s also hitting consumers where it hurts; in the pocket.

And this in turn is creating a culture change in how we respond to food waste which has impacted on our grocery shopping habits.  The 2017 Waitrose Food and Drink Report says that consumers now treat supermarkets like walk-in fridges with two-thirds of Britons nipping to a supermarket more than once a day, and one in 10 people decide what to buy for an evening meal just before they eat it – often stopping to shop for it on the way home from work.

Longer opening hours and more convenience stores combined with a drive among shoppers to waste less and stop themselves “over-buying” has led to a new trend that Waitrose is calling “as and when shopping”.

Waitrose said the changes in the way we shop and eat are bringing some unexpected changes – like the trolley downsizing – just a few years ago, an average Waitrose would open with around 200 big trolleys and 150 shallow ‘daily shopper’ trolleys lined up outside. These days the tables have turned, with 250 shallow ‘daily shoppers’ and just 70 big trolleys needed.”

 

Wellness and the Home

Over the last few years, Wellness has become a word many have heard all too much. It is something we see on social media, on the news, and in magazines, and is now a word hard to escape from.

With various industries across the spectrum capitalising on it, a look into what Wellness really is, and what it can do for us, is long overdue. Holiday companies are selling out of mindfulness and yoga retreats, health-food accounts on Instagram are monopolising the web, and spa treatments are more popular than ever.

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Why are experiences more valuable than possessions?

Seeking out experiences rather than purchasing more stuff has been a trend lurking in the corners of psychology for the last few years.

Research in 2014 by Dr. Thomas Gilovich, a psychology professor from the University of Cornell, concluding that “experiences are the glue of our social lives”, mattering much more than the latest i-gadget.

Why do experiences matter?

  • Experiential purchases enhance social relations more readily and effectively than material goods
  • Experiential purchases form a bigger part of a person’s identity
  • Experiential purchases are evaluated more on their own terms and evoke fewer social comparisons than material purchases.

Studies also suggest that the anticipation of an experience is also crucial. Thomas Gilovich’s research showed that people reported being mostly frustrated before the planned purchase of a ‘thing’, but mostly happy before they bought an ‘experience’.

As that happy feeling is tied up with a memory, it lingers longer. Colin Strong, head of behavioural science at market research group Ispos, calls it the ‘hedonic adaption’, claiming that the hedonic payoff of experiences is much greater than material purchases.

The Experience Consumer

We are now seeing how this trend is affecting our spending habits and the way we consume, such as a 55% increase in ticket sales to events and live experiences, as research by the world’s largest event technology platform, Eventbrite, found.

And according to Barclaycard, which processes about half of all Britain’s credit and debit card transactions, their figures for April 17 show a 20% increase in spending in pubs compared with the same month last year. Spending in restaurants went up 16%, while theatres and cinemas enjoyed a 13% rise. Meanwhile, department stores suffered a 1% drop, vehicle sales were down 11% and spending on household appliances fell by 2.5%

Clothes retailer Next claim their first fall in profits in eight years is due to the experience economy, and Ikea’s head of sustainability, Steve Howard, is of the opinion that consumption of many goods has reached a limit, referring to this limit as hitting ‘peak stuff’

Building a Brand Experience

Fuelled by social media, the experience economy is a trend that will continue to grow. Instagram accounts used to be about our new car, handbag or pair of shoes, but now that seems slightly vulgar compared to our friend’s yoga holiday or sky-diving weekend.

Building a product brand that taps into the experience economy involves going beyond a ‘sell and forget’ mentality. When Meile launched their revolutionary steam oven, they also developed a set of cookery courses for their steam oven customers. After completing a hands-on steam oven cookery session, attendees proudly tweet, instagram and facebook the results to all their contacts, turning them into a very effective sales force for Meile, without even a mention of a Meile product.

 

Kitchen Purchase Behaviour, Consumer Insight Report 2016

This consumer insight report looks at the motivating factors behind the decision to purchase a new kitchen, investigating multi-family households, the ageing demographic, flexible working conditions, the space available, even the TV programmes we watch, to understand how these influence the way in which we use our kitchen space.

AN UPDATED EDITION OF THIS REPORT IS NOW AVAILABLE
CLICK HERE>

This research takes a step back and starts from before the actual purchase process in order to explore the way UK homeowners use their kitchens; how they cook, shop for groceries, socialise and relax. It investigates how family circumstances and household demographics, multi-functional space issues and emerging smart technologies can impact on how kitchens are planned and which products are purchased.

The results of this research have enabled us to produce 6 different kitchen consumer profiles, which will aid manufacturers and retailers of kitchen products in identifying their target market and creating a structured approach to product development and marketing communications.

The report gives a fascinating insight into people’s diverse requirements for their individual kitchens and highlight a number of opportunities for innovation and growth for kitchen product brands.

Key Findings

  • Spending is back on the agenda with homeowners showing a willingness to invest in a new kitchen because they are not prepared to wait any longer for a new one
  • Luxury goes mainstream as what were previously considered high-ticket appliances rise steeply in popularity
  • Kitchens are not as social as we would like with homeowners complaining that their new kitchens don’t provide enough space to entertain.
  • Lack of space continues to be the main issue with new kitchens and although there many be opportunities to add an extension or create an open plan space, making the best use of storage and work surfaces is more important for many new kitchens
  • Although the smart kitchen is a trend that has grown significantly over the past 3 years, many homeowners are still failing to understand how the technology will work in their own homes.

kitchen consumer trends

The 2018 edition of this report is now available 
Click here to view>

Also available from December 2018 – Kitchen Behaviours and Product Usage 2018

If you are a Kitchen Category Insight Partner, these reports will automatically be added to your account

Ikea launches furniture range for pets

Ikea pet furniture range

Have you ever felt like your cat or dog wasn’t just a pet, but a member of the family?  You are not alone.

IKEA felt there was a gap in the market for reasonably priced, but nice-looking pet products and developed a pet product range.  The new LURVIG collection, which means “hairy” in Swedish, was launched in five countries — Japan, France, Canada, U.S and Portugal at the start of October.

Ikea pet furniture range

Created by pet loving designer, Inma Burmudez,  with support from veterinarians,  according to Ikea “the range covers all the bases of our shared life with pets indoors and out, so you and your pet can enjoy your home together“.

Ikea furniture for cats

Ikea furniture for dogs

Source:  Ikea