Category Archives: Consumer

The Cabin Spacey Minimal House

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Is the Cabin Spacey ‘minimal house’ what the home of the future looks like?

When they decided to think about making a prototype to meet the demands of how people will live in the future, architects Simon Becker and Andreas Rauch set about addressing some of the restrictions of traditional living today.

The configuration of most apartments comprises two rooms, a kitchen and a bathroom, and has changed very little for generations. The team wanted to come up with something more flexible that addressed the changing needs of the ‘modern metropolitan’.

Equally, as urbanisation continues and space becomes an increasingly sought-after commodity, they needed the cabin to be compact.

The smallest unit measures just over 25sq metres and can comfortably accommodate two people. The king-sized bed overlooks the living area, and features storage space and a USB docking station.

The bathroom is equipped with Grohe products, and the kitchen is kitted out with a hob, steaming hot tap, fridge, washing machine, and coffee machine, with many of the products by Bosch.

The multi-functional lounge area has a window seat that doubles as a guest bed, as well as a dining table. There is an array of smart tech that enhances home comfort and efficiency, including a smart mirror, intelligent heating control, Sonos sound system, Phillips Hue lighting system, Amazon Echo and Kiwi.ki smart lock.

One of the main advantages of the ‘minimal house’ is that it is completely sustainable, with a solid wooden structure made from renewable raw materials.

A large solar battery, integrated into the innovation’s sandwich floor and with panels on the roof to collect energy from the sun, provides power so even though the Cabin Spacey is connected to the energy network, it produces energy itself.

When coming up with Cabin Spacey, Becker and Rauch decided that today’s ‘urban nomads’ require a home that is above all easy to transport and to install.

“An increasing demand for mobility is shaping new forms and habits of accommodation,” says Becker. “Our overall goal from the beginning was to lower the access barriers to appropriate living space in exceptional locations.”

The beauty of Cabin Spacey is that it can be hooked up to existing utilities and infrastructures, so in theory is able to be set down just as easily in a car park, as it is in a garden or on a stretch of urban wasteland, or on an unused roof.

According to the company, Berlin alone has space for 55,000 apartments on unused rooftops that are unsuitable for development, but where Cabin Spacey might work perfectly.

Cabin Spacey was not a pop-up idea. It’s a combined answer to several paradigm shifts, newly arisen needs and behaviour changes in living and travelling – Simon Becker, CEO and founder of Cabin Spacey @cabinspacey #tinyhousemovement Click To Tweet

Officially launched last June, the result is an environmentally friendly, intelligent space, that meets the occupants’ needs, while offering all-round flexibility for contemporary living.

Source: Cabin Spacey

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Ikea and the Circular Economy

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The news that Ikea is to start renting out office furniture such as desks and chairs, starting in Switzerland, comes as no surprise. The company launched its People & Planet Positive strategy in June 2018, making a global commitment to removing all single-use plastic products in their range by 2020.

Alongside that, it promised to ‘inspire and enable people to live more sustainably’, designing its products with new circular principles using renewable and recycled materials only.

“By 2030, our ambition is to be a circular business built on clean, renewable energy and regenerative resources, decoupling material use from our growth,” the company said.

Ikea was founded in 1943 by the late Ingvar Kamprad when he was just 17 and has evolved into a global giant with more that 420 stores.

The move to lease furniture is a significant one for a business, now said to be the largest furniture retailer in the world, and while it’s beginning with office furniture, the next step is said to be to rent out kitchens.

Talking to the Financial Times, Torbjorn Lööf, the chief executive of parent company Inter Ikea, said:

“You could say leasing is another way of financing a kitchen. When this circular model is up and running, we have a much bigger interest in not just selling a product but seeing what happens with it and that the consumer takes care of it.”

For Ikea, a circular business model whereby the company designs products that can be repaired, reused, recycled or resold is the goal, and this complementary leasing model forms part of the ultimate aim.

It already offers a simple five-step process on its website that enables consumers to have used Ikea products valued with a view to resale, and it also has facilities that allow shoppers to return items that have been damaged in transit so they can be repaired and donated to charity rather than wasted.

Speaking to Trend-Monitor, futurist Will Higham explained why buying and possessing items has become less relevant to Generation Rent.

“The sense of the importance of ownership itself is starting to ease away,” he said. “This is a generation that grew up with constantly upgrading their mobile phone, and now you can rent things, download things, subscribe to them – I can access a car but I don’t need to own one. So when it comes to our homes, are we going to go back to this idea of renting our furniture and TVs, and are manufacturers and retailers going to offer us opportunities to rent and upgrade things?”

With sustainability Ikea’s top priority, this would appear to be the case, and it remains focused on delivering on its promise.

On 7th February it opened Ikea Greenwich, which it says is its most sustainable store yet, designed with Londoners and the environment in mind, and complete with greywater recycling, rainwater treatment and solar panels.

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The message is clear: the retail landscape is rapidly changing and Ikea is staying one step ahead of developing trends to keep giving its customers what they want.

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What really goes on in the shower?

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Following a spate of research studies into the UK’s showering habits, we give a round-up of the findings to find out what the UK consumer actually wants from the showering experience and what this means for shower manufacturers and retailers.

According to a recent poll by YouGov Omnibus and Yahoo News UK, which asked 2,034 Britons how often, on average, they tend to have a shower or a bath, 49% said once a day. Trend-Monitor’s own research in its Behind the Bathroom Door 2018 study, found that participants had on average one shower per day, and that those who shower more than that, tend to do so for a specific reason, such as a social occasion or after exercise.

Clearly, the primary reason for having a shower is to get clean. Or is it?

When bathroom retail franchise Ripples conducted a social media survey in September 2018, they asked respondents to categorise their showering styles. According to the survey, 67% of people found the shower to be a ‘sanctuary’. YouGov research commissioned by Mira Showers, which surveyed over 2,000 UK adults, backs up the Ripples study, revealing that 40% of people shower because they find it relaxing, they enjoy it and because they like to escape reality.

The same research also found that 70% of 18-24-year-olds, and 53% of parents with children aged 4-years-old and under, multitask in the shower.

So what does ‘multitasking’ in the shower mean?

Some of these activities are cleanliness related, but by no means all. According to Mira, 16% of UK adults shave in the shower, 13% listen to music, 10% sing, 7% brush their teeth, and 7% stream or watch TV.  When it comes to social media, Snapchat users check their phone while showering more than any other social network user, and 207,310 Londoners – 3% of adults living in London – like to drink in the shower.

Some of our showering activities are cleanliness related, but by no means all. 16% of UK adults shave in the shower, 13% listen to music, 10% sing, 7% brush their teeth, and 7% stream or watch TV. Click To Tweet

Trend-Monitor’s own research revealed that the average time spent in the shower ranges from 5 minutes to 20 minutes. However, the fact that 22% spent over 15 minutes in the shower can be explained by the trend to multi-task. Showering offers a quick solution when what is required is a five-minute ‘turbo wash’, but it also offers a retreat from a fast-paced lifestyle and a hectic household.

Retreating away from other people was flagged up in Trend-Monitor’s Behind the Bathroom Door research. Those who showered regularly were emphatic that the shower was not a shared space.   In the Ripples research, when asked whether they viewed their showering area as a ‘social’ space, characterised as a place that is shared to save on time and water, out of the four categories this came third.

Mira’s research indicates that 64% of UK adults prefer to shower, confirming that it has beaten the bath to become UK’s most popular method of getting clean.  However, the evidence points to the fact that showering has clearly become so much more than that.  It seems that millennials are spending the most time in the shower and getting the most enjoyment out of it – 19% of 18-24-year-olds said they take the length of time they do in the shower because they like to escape reality.

As showering continues to move beyond simply being a way to keep clean, there’s much that manufacturers and retailers can do to maximise on this trend in terms of their marketing strategies, the use of bathroom technology and the design of the bathroom, as well as the design of showering products.

As showering continues to move beyond simply being a way to keep clean, there’s much that manufacturers and retailers can do to maximise on this trend Click To Tweet

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Understanding the Kitchen and Bathroom Consumer in 2019

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This report focuses on emerging consumer trends and how they will define what consumers will want to buy for their homes in the future.

If you are a TREND-MONITOR Insight Partner, this report will automatically be added to your account

With the focus of 2018 being so much on Brexit and its unsettling influence on the UK economy, it is tempting to view all consumer behaviours through the ‘Brexit’ lens, when in reality, consumer behaviours and attitudes are moulded by many different influences and drivers.

Demographic and social trends within the UK, combined with an interwoven mix of wider trends such as urbanisation, an ageing population, social isolation and decreasing living spaces is continuing to impact on consumers, causing them to reassess their priorities and ask themselves some searching questions. Do I need this? Why am I paying for something I don’t use all the time? What impact does this product have on the environment?

Sometimes changes in consumer behaviours quickly lead to major disruptions within a sector, such as the impact of the sharing economy on the travel industry. Other behavioural changes slowly mould and transform a sector over a period of time into a better version of itself such as the impact of Wellness on the home improvement sector.

This report takes a look forward into 2019 and highlights the key changes in consumer attitudes and behaviours that will have the greatest impact on kitchen, bathroom and surface brands.

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Influencer Interview – Will Higham, Consumer and Behavioural Futurist

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Will Higham is one of the world’s most respected behavioural futurists.  He has informed 1000’s of business leaders via his talks, consultancy, articles and book ‘The Next Big Thing’. He’s spent almost 30,000 hours over the last 15 years analysing consumer trends and their implications for business.

In this interview, we talk to Will about the consumer trends he thinks will have the greatest influence on the way we use our homes in the future. 

Interview by Emma Hedges

TM. How has the trend for multi-generational living come about?

WH. One of the big trends we’ve seen over the past few years has been towards one-person homes, however, while the drive towards the single home is still happening among older people, we’re now starting to see a reaction against it towards larger households.

For financial reasons, and also for social and emotional reasons, young people are not leaving the family as early as previous generations did, and they are content to stay at home. There are broadly closer ties between parents and children now, and they are typically doing more together – more family holidays, more evening and weekend meals. In the same way that businesses have flatter hierarchies, so do families – more and more the parents and children are making joint decisions.

Millennials and post-millennials have grown up in a risk-averse society, with lots of people telling them they’re in danger all the time, so they have this sense of friends and family being an important community. There’s three times as many 25 to 34 year olds living with their parents as living on their own right now.

The other thing is that while some elderly people are living on their own, more of them are starting to move back to their children’s homes, for financial reasons and because of health issues. People are living longer so there’s a longer period of care required, and for a lot of them, their savings aren’t going as far as they thought they would.
Next year we’re going to have the most three-generation households ever seen in this country - Will Higham, Behavioural Futurist @NextBigThingCo Click To Tweet


TM. What impact do you think this trend will have on kitchens and bathrooms?

WH. This has huge potential impact on kitchens and bathrooms. You need to have more bathrooms if you’ve got more people in a home, but also the bathroom needs to be functional for all three generations. They need to be safe, with more rails, as well as offer an escape for people to get away from the big household.

This trend is also going to accelerate the kitchen diner and kitchen as a social place. There’ll be things in the kitchen that people won’t use as much as they become less well, and things such as microwaves that they may use more. Kitchens may become even bigger.

And one thing that bathroom and kitchen manufacturers need to focus on is the fact that we will see a huge growth in care homes. That’s a major market for them to bear in mind.
The three-generation household will accelerate the kitchen as a social place - Will Higham, Behavioural Futurist @NextBigThingCo Click To Tweet


TM. How is ‘Generation Rent’ impacting the way people use their homes?

WH. The younger generation can’t afford to buy houses at the moment, and they’re having to rent, but one of the biggest rises we’ve seen in rental is amongst older consumers – a 500% increase in thirty-to-forty-something renters over the past five years.

The sense of the importance of ownership itself is starting ease away. This is a generation that grew up with constantly upgrading their mobile phone, and now you can rent things, download things, subscribe to them – I can access a car but I don’t need to own one. So when it comes to our homes, are we going to go back to this idea of renting our furniture and our TVs, and are manufacturers and retailers going to offer us opportunities to rent and upgrade things? Or are we going to be able to get a basic fridge, but then get a smart device we can plug into it?

One of the biggest rises we’ve seen in the rental market is amongst older consumers – a 500% increase in thirty-to-forty-something home renters over the past five years - Will Higham, Behavioural Futurist @NextBigThingCo Click To Tweet


TM. How do you see technology impacting on kitchens and bathrooms?

WH. We’re on the cusp of huge changes with the technology side of kitchens and bathrooms, and if manufacturers get it right, I see people adopting it very quickly. I think the smart home will really start to take off in the next five years. The trouble with the smart home is that the technology has been a little bit behind the ideas.

I think we’ll see more intuitive and ‘calm’ technology, that isn’t in your face and will do things without us asking it to. It’s interesting to see the incredible rise of voice assistants like Alexa, which is easy to operate and feels human. We will definitely see more voice control in kitchens and bathrooms, partly for convenience and also for safety. They’re places where it’s difficult to use traditional personal technology.

And the smart mirror in the bathroom is the equivalent of the smart surface in the kitchen for me. Being able to weigh things on the kitchen surface is one thing, but the smart mirror will be able to tell you about your BMI, your health, and so on.
We’re on the cusp of huge changes with the technology side of kitchens and bathrooms, and if manufacturers get it right, I see people adopting it very quickly - Will Higham, Behavioural Futurist @NextBigThingCo Click To Tweet


TM. How is hybrid living affecting the home?

WH. Britons are now spending 90% of our lives indoors, whether it’s at home or in the office. More and more of us are working for ourselves, and the number of entrepreneurs is going up, particularly among slightly older women. Increasingly we want to run our own thing, so the two growth areas are the shared office and the home work-space.

The hybrid home is interesting as we’re seeing a general hybridisation of the home. We have a kitchen diner that looks increasingly like another living room, and furniture and technology that can be moved from room to room. As our lives flow through the house we can make the house whatever we want, whenever we want it.
We’re seeing a general hybridisation of the home. We have a kitchen diner that looks increasingly like another living room, and furniture and technology that can be moved from room to room. As our lives flow through the house we can make… Click To Tweet 


TM. Tell us about the trend for pet ownership?

WH. The idea of family, neighbours, work colleagues, people we share a hobby or an interest with – the one thing that’s increasingly added to these small trust groups is a pet. A lot of people who aren’t having families are having pets – ‘fur babies’ – and the amount of money we’re spending on them is phenomenal. We’re spending more in terms of the type of food we’re buying for them, the type of habitats we’re creating for them. It certainly affects the kind of holidays we can have – there are now more pet-friendly hotels and restaurants.  And in the same way that people think about a child when they’re fitting their bathroom and their kitchen, they will be thinking about their pets when they’re doing that.
In the same way that people think about a child when they’re fitting their bathroom and their kitchen, they will be thinking about their pets when they’re doing that - Will Higham, Behavioural Futurist @NextBigThingCo Click To Tweet


TM. Are there any behaviours that will affect how we buy big-ticket items in the future?

WH. We’re seeing the idea of the ‘signature’ piece across so many industries. The small specialist artisanal producers at one end and the mass on the other – those are the areas that are working, and the area in the middle isn’t working so well. I think this will happen more within homeware – there will be a few statement pieces, and there will be a higher turnover of the little items we only have for a short time, like stools or tables.

Generally, I think we’ll have more sustainable furniture, as consumers are starting to be willing to pay a little bit more for something that’s sustainable. In terms of technology-led items like cookers, fridges and showers, it may be that we buy ‘dumb’ products that we can upgrade the software on, like the little stick we have that we can put in the side of the TV. We will definitely see big-ticket items becoming smarter.
The three-generational household will impact the sorts of big-ticket items we buy. Instead of two people deciding on it, there will be half a dozen - Will Higham, Behavioural Futurist @NextBigThingCo Click To Tweet
Find out more about Will Higham at www.next-big-thing.net

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Trend-Monitor Report

Understanding The Kitchen and Bathroom Consumer in 2019


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Key Consumer Trend – Face to Face Interactions

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In a world increasingly dominated by technology, our social activities are undertaken via a screen and we engage with automated responses. This in turn is causing increased social isolation.

As a counterbalance, consumers are looking to escape from the digital world, seeking out tangible experiences and healthier activities as a way of engaging with real people. These experiences often take the form of a challenge or passion for something bigger than the mundane, with the goal of inspiring others. Ironically, it is this goal that takes the consumer full circle back to technology as the experiences are shared via social media.

Why this matters

The trend for creating a consumer experience in a retail environment has long been documented by Trend-Monitor, however this experience often relies heavily on technology and not necessarily on engagement with real people.

Developing the trend for creating a consumer experience into a real life challenge relating to a product purchase not only generates the face to face interaction consumers are seeking, but also takes the purchase beyond being just another transaction and satisfies the ongoing consumer need to share their experiences and inspirations via social media.

Trend-Monitor-Consumer-Trends-2019

This report highlights the key trends influencing the kitchen and bathroom consumer in 2019

With the focus of 2018 being so much on Brexit and its unsettling influence on the UK economy, it is tempting to view all consumer behaviours through the ‘Brexit’ lens, when in reality, consumer behaviours and attitudes are moulded by many different influences and drivers.


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Key Consumer Trend – Wellness goes Tech

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As technology permeates every area of our lives, this has created high expectations when it comes to the intuitiveness and functionality of technology in the home. 

And wellness is no exception.

What originally started out as the consumer requirement for a calm space away from the busy-ness of our digital worlds, has developed into the requirement for personalised solutions to integrate with the body’s natural cycles.

Wellness has gone tech.

As consumers we are still seeking out natural light, air quality, greenery and silence but now it is coupled with the requirement to understand and
analyse the body’s response to this environment and its impact on our physical and mental wellbeing.

Why this matters

Technology in the kitchen will need to make life easier for the consumer, as well as educate and encourage a healthier diet. Not only feeding the body in a one-dimensional sense, but tracking nutrition and boosting immunity.

The expectations for bathroom technology is that it is able to track bodily functions, analyse trends in health data and to provide an early warning system for detectable conditions such as obesity and diabetes.

 

Trend-Monitor-Consumer-Trends-2019

This report highlights the key trends influencing the kitchen and bathroom consumer in 2019

With the focus of 2018 being so much on Brexit and its unsettling influence on the UK economy, it is tempting to view all consumer behaviours through the ‘Brexit’ lens, when in reality, consumer behaviours and attitudes are moulded by many different influences and drivers.


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Key Consumer Trend – Buying Time

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Increasingly time is becoming a commodity and very often a luxury; something that consumers are willing to pay for in order to prioritise things they really want to do, such as spending time with family and friends or trying new experiences for example rather than doing chores and everyday tasks

In fact, time itself has become a form of currency, as shown by the price premiums commanded by highly efficient and effective convenience products that better facilitate busy lifestyles.

Financial pressure and economic anxiety in today’s world has intensified the need to work more and for longer, placing greater restrictions on personal
downtime. Plus non-standard employment hours and the increasing number of people working from home has meant that the lines between work and private lives are blurred, giving the perception of having less time, whether or not this is actually the case.

Why this matters

A recent study by YouGov highlighted the greatest appeal of smart appliances was that ‘they make my life easier’, it is therefore no surprise that home assistants such as Alexa are becoming increasingly popular. In fact Amazon’s Echo Dot smart speaker and its built-in Alexa voice assistant dominated the 2017 Christmas sales and this year the number of Alexa-powered devices going online at once during the holiday season caused the Alexa servers to crash.

38% of smart appliance owners claim ‘They make my life easier’ according to a recent study by YouGov Click To Tweet

Trend-Monitor’s own research looked at the role of technology in the bathroom and whilst bathroom technology in general got a rather lukewarm response, it was clear that there was interest if the technology could be proved to be practical rather than gimmicky and ‘made the bathroom easier to use’.

However, consumers are not just turning to technology to save time. Convenient delivery times, help with the set-up of new products, disposal of old products, local support desks, developing smaller more portable products are all ways to provide a service that makes consumers’ lives easier.

 

Trend-Monitor-Consumer-Trends-2019

This report highlights the key trends influencing the kitchen and bathroom consumer in 2019

With the focus of 2018 being so much on Brexit and its unsettling influence on the UK economy, it is tempting to view all consumer behaviours through the ‘Brexit’ lens, when in reality, consumer behaviours and attitudes are moulded by many different influences and drivers.


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Key Consumer Trend – Rethinking Waste

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Each year when BBC Radio 2 run their 500 words short-story writing competition for children aged between 5-13, the Oxford University Press examines the words used in the stories sent to the contest to find out the ‘word of the year’.

This year, the word ‘Plastic’ came up top, appearing 3,359 times in the 134,790 stories submitted and up 100% from last year, with children sending in stories with  titles such as The Plastic Shore and The Evil Mr Plastic. David Attenborough’s Blue Planet II programme is credited with influencing these stories, as the use of the terms such as recycle and recycling also increased, along with packaging, pollution, plastic bottle, plastic bag, and plastic waste. Children have shown they are acutely aware of the impact plastic has on our environment and how it will affect their own future -Vineeta Gupta ,the head of children’s dictionaries at Oxford University Press Click To Tweet Why this matters A company’s green credentials and the effect they have on the environment have never been under more scrutiny. A new international study by Unilever reveals that a third of consumers are now choosing to buy from brands they believe are doing social or environmental good. The study asked 20,000 adults from five countries how their sustainability concerns impact their choices in-store and at home. It also mapped their claims against real purchase decisions, giving a more accurate picture than ever of what people are actually buying – and why. Today’s consumer has high expectations in terms of social and environmental issues and looks beyond just the financial cost of their purchase. They are becoming increasingly interested in brands which use a more ‘Circular’ business model which not only use the minimal amount of the earth’s valuable resources but are also manufactured in a way that designs out waste throughout the life cycle of the product or where waste is given new life. The circular concept is not only model for a greener and healthier planet, it’s also a developing consumer mindset. Click To Tweet  
Trend-Monitor-Consumer-Trends-2019

This report highlights the key trends influencing the kitchen and bathroom consumer in 2019

With the focus of 2018 being so much on Brexit and its unsettling influence on the UK economy, it is tempting to view all consumer behaviours through the ‘Brexit’ lens, when in reality, consumer behaviours and attitudes are moulded by many different influences and drivers.

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Bathroom Purchasing Trends, Consumer Insight Report 2018

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Welcome to the 2018 TREND-MONITOR consumer insight report into bathroom purchasing trends.

For this purposes of this research, TREND-MONITOR was pleased to partner with The Bathroom Manufacturers’ Association, an independent forum for bathroom manufacturers trading in the UK.  This partnership gave the association’s 60+ members the opportunity to contribute to the research structure, resulting in a focused piece of industry research that is directly relevant to manufacturers and retailers in this diverse market sector.

Alongside this consumer insight research, a second study called ‘Behind the Bathroom Door’ featured a 7-day bathroom habits and routines diary, which assessed participants’ water usage within privacy of their own bathroom.

The insight gained from these two studies answers important questions in terms of consumer requirements for their bathroom, how bathroom products are being used in the home, attitudes to water efficiency, and how this in turn influences consumer purchase behaviour for new bathroom products.

“This insight into consumer behaviour provides valuable information for our members and the bathroom industry.

Finding ways to save water and energy has never been more important and the results of this survey can influence future product development to help achieve this aim.

The surveys also show that compliance is an issue that needs to be addressed. Consumers are interested in having more information about products and have indicated that knowing a product was energy efficient would positively influence their buying decision. 

This gives us all in the industry an opportunity to respond and promote products that display the Water Label.”

Yvonne Orgill, CEO, Bathroom Manufacturers Association

 

The research was undertaken via an online consumer survey with a nationally representative sample of UK householders who had purchased a complete new bathroom or cloakroom within the past two years.

The survey consisted of 42 multi-choice questions, plus qualifying and status questions and was conducted online during May 2018, targeting a response rate of 500+ respondents.

Trend-Monitor-Bathroom-Purchasing-Trends-Respondents

Key Findings

1. Additional Bathrooms & Cloakrooms

Households adding new additional bathrooms and cloakrooms (as opposed to replacing existing rooms) account for 10% of new bathroom/cloakroom installations. Half of these additional bathrooms/cloakrooms are being fitted for practical reasons such as mobility or disability issues, or to accommodate a large or extended family

2. Research Goes Off-Line

89% of householders undertake some kind of research prior to purchasing their new kitchen, with researching via a ‘bricks and mortar’ retail outlet being the most popular and useful research resource.

3.  Shopping Around

Householders no longer expect to be tied to one retailer for all of their bathroom products, indicated by the 54% of bathroom installations which were purchased from more than one retail outlet

4.  Space Availability

Products that make the best use of the available space are at the top of consumers wish-lists for their new bathroom, and ahead of other key purchase influencers such as quality and price.

5.  More Information Please

Sales of water efficient products are being hampered by lack of customer awareness. Up to 80% of bathroom consumers indicated that water efficiency was a key purchase influencer, however over 40% were not made aware of the amount of water individual products will use.

Contents

FOREWORD
SCOPE & METHODOLOGY
KEY FINDINGS
ABOUT THE SURVEY RESPONDENTS
THE UK BATHROOM MARKET DRIVERS
SECTION 1: MOTIVATING FACTORS
SECTION 2: BATHROOM BUDGET
SECTION 3: BATHROOM CHOICES
SECTION 4: RESEARCH PRIOR TO PURCHASE
SECTION 5: CHOICE OF RETAILER
SECTION 6: THE BATHROOM FITTER
SECTION 7: ADDITIONAL BATHROOM ITEMS
SECTION 8: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR SHOWER CONTROLS
SECTION 9: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR SHOWER TRAYS
SECTION 10: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR SHOWER ENCLOSURES
SECTION 11: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR BATHS
SECTION 12: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR TAPS
SECTION 13: PURCHASE DECISIONS FOR TOILETS
SECTION 14: EXTERNAL INFLUENCES

List of Charts

Chart 1: Type of Bathroom Fitted
Chart 2: Reason for Replacing Existing Bathroom/Cloakroom
Chart 3: Location of Additional Bathroom/Cloakroom
Chart 4: Total Bathroom/Cloakroom Budget
Chart 5: Budget by Bathroom Type
Chart 6: Bathroom Style by Budget
Chart 7: Research Breakdown by Type
Chart 8: Most Useful Research Undertaken Prior to Purchase
Chart 9: Choice of Retailer
Chart 10: Influential Factors in Choice of Retailer
Chart 11: Choosing a Bathroom/Cloakroom Fitter
Chart 12: Additional Items Purchased for the Bathroom
Chart 13: Choice of Shower Control
Chart 14: Influential Factors in Choice of Shower Control
Chart 15: Awareness Factors when choosing Shower Control
Chart 16: Choice of Shower Tray
Chart 17: Influential Factors in Choice of Shower Tray
Chart 18: Awareness Factors when Choosing a Shower Tray
Chart 19: Choice of Shower Enclosure
Chart 20: Influential Factors in Choice of Shower Enclosure
Chart 21: Awareness Factors when Choosing a Shower Enclosure
Chart 22: Choice of Bath
Chart 23: Influential Factors in Choice of Bath
Chart 24: Awareness Factors when Choosing a Bath
Chart 25: Influential Factors in Choice of Taps
Chart 27: Awareness Factors when choosing a Toilet
Chart 28: Main Influence on Choice of Products
Chart 30: Awareness of Damage Caused by Abrasive Cleaners
Chart 31: Source of Information Regarding Abrasive Cleaners

Trend-Monitor Bathroom category Insight Partners,
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Members of the Bathroom Manufacturers Association,
please see email from the BMA containing details on how to download this report 

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